Chroniko’s Boots – How Kaiba Portrays a Corrupt Society

Episode 3 of Kaiba, Chroniko’s Boots is brimming with pathos, to a nearly jarring extent from the preceding episode. It portrays how family and society both have taken advantage of an impoverished girl and then analyzes how riddled with guilt the aunt, Negi, is who encouraged Chroniko to sell her body. Screen Shot 2017-03-20 at 21.45.25.png

So, I’ve seen others interpret this differently, but I assumed that when or before Chroniko was sold, Negi knew it would mean her death (or effective death— we can assume that spending an eternity without a body as a collection of fractured memories is pretty comparable to death). That explains why she was crying and felt so much guilt over the affair— she had participated in the death of the girl she had raised as her daughter. This cruel and unjust action is then spun on its head, as we see the events prior to Negi turning bitter and preferring her own children to Chroniko.

Chroniko is clearly the representation of innocent youth— she is a young girl who openly brags about a gift from her aunt in spite of it being one of her aunt’s only demonstrations of love toward her. Beyond this, she is willing to abandon her own body for the sake of her family. While she did not know this was a death sentence, it was established in the first episode how miserable life can be stuck in a collection of body-less faces or how many people remained trapped as tiny memory chips for years and we can assume she resigned herself to this fate knowingly and willingly. Screen Shot 2017-03-20 at 21.42.46.png

In Chroniko’s Boots, society continues to be affirmed as corrupt by having bodies sold for cash— specifically how Chroniko’s body is sold to a pedophile. No, really, they say that in the show—Screen Shot 2017-03-20 at 21.48.47.pngThe society in Kaiba here is portrayed as the corruption of capitalism with all of the wealth and power belonging to a tiny number of rich people and none of the wealth or power belonging to anybody else. While Chroniko did sell her body of her own accord (though she didn’t expect it to entail her memories being released), the blatant message is that it is wrong of society to allow such things to happen and if society had a higher bare minimum for the standard for living, the tragedy of Chroniko being sold for money would never have happened in the first place.

We see that Negi wanted Chroniko gone since she was unwanted and a burden on the family— a sentiment which initially puts her at the forefront of blame over the whole society. This is immediately subverted with an ultimate re-emphasis on society as the one to blame as Kaiba steps into her memories to find how Negi was once kind and loving but with the loss of her arms and death of her husband she became cynical and jaded toward the world and ultimately grew to despise Chroniko as “one more mouth to feed” as she expresses initially. The reassignment of blame and then subversion thereof serves to strengthen the message of society being at fault for this happening.  Screen Shot 2017-03-20 at 22.28.18.png

When it is revealed in episode 6 that Kaiba is definitively supposed to be the king, Warp, (we already knew Kaiba was Warp, but we didn’t know for sure who Warp was until now) there is a sudden disconnect as viewers consider this episode— Kaiba is demonstrated to be kind and empathic, so how could he have let society come to a point where the masses consider him an oppressive dictator and selling the bodies of children to pedophiles is acceptable?

As a side thought, perhaps part of the reason Kaiba empathized so thoroughly with Chroniko is that he felt he had experienced the same thing? After all, he felt as though his mother had betrayed him by poisoning him. Just something to consider.

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