Video Games Are The Apex Of Art

Broadly speaking, there are three types of learning: visual, audible, and kinesthetic. These categories are generalized so when people say they’re a __ learning that’s an oversimplification of their information consuming progress, but I digress. I encourage you to think of art in these three forms, though, for a moment.

Visual art at its most fundamental level is easily defined— paintings, drawing, etchings, sculptures, et cetera. Kinesthetic is too— basically dance. I’m going to expand by definition of audible art to include most forms of storytelling, though, because a story is a linear recollection of events, real or fictional, which is most innately similar to how we process sound. Furthermore, storytelling is largely based off of words or can at least be described in words, and the first words and story were entirely told audibly. So, by this logic, a book is audible art, even though we use our eyes to read it. The key here is that it is linear— you can have a painting tell a story, but your eyes aren’t typically drawn to different parts of a painting in a certain order.

Image result for cave painting

A defining trait of modern, postmodern, and post-postmodern (whatever you call contemporary) art is the multimedia shift (paintings on sculptures, digitization of photographs, there are endless combinations) and this intersects with the “three types of art” categorization in an interesting way. Prior to the 20th century, graphic novels were generally pretty fringe, the only exception to this I know of being the Bible (if I remember my history class right, they’d do lots of drawings in the margins of Bibles back when they were handwritten). Therefore, the only combination of two different categories that comes to mind is dancing to music, combining kinesthetic and audible forms of art.

Image result for handwritten bible medieval

Graphic novels and movies, however, introduced the combination of visual and audible art for the first time— you had visual occurrences telling a narrative. Yes, still images can tell a narrative too, but not to the same linear extent. The exceptions to this would works like Michelangelo’s paintings and other serial works. But combining words with pictures and pictures with motion was truly when audible/visual combinations began. Other ways of combining these categories sprang into existence too— music videos, hands-on art, the sort. However, it wasn’t until the 60s or so that even the f0undations of a medium combining all three categories existed— games. The modern video game satisfies the audible side by often telling a cohesive narrative and also having music, it satisfies the visual side by having things happen on a screen, and it satisfies the kinesthetic side by being something that the consumer *does* as opposed to sees. With a game, you experience the art rather than view it from an outsider’s perspective. Perhaps I am mistaken, but this is the first time such a combination came into existence while also being effectively one single medium.

Image result for undertale

That’s all I had to say on this, at least for now. #showerthoughts

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